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jdfwarrior

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  1. Thanks
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from Alec in Run script not working while terminal command works   
    Since you are new to Alfred 2, let me explain the difference in case it wasn't already obvious.
     
    A run script (with the language set to bash) is the same as running the command from the terminal except it runs it in the background with no new windows popping up.
    Terminal command will launch a terminal window and run the command in that new window.
     
    If a command works normally in a Terminal Command item, then it should work normally as a Run Script with the language set accordingly as long as the script isn't reliant upon something in your profile settings or environment variables. Alfred doesn't import your environment so, if you have environment variables set that the script would need access to, these would need to be brought into Alfred. Also, paths in Alfred are relative to the folder that the workflow is stored in. So if you needed to access something in your documents folder, you wouldn't just use "cd Documents" assuming that you started in your home directory, you would have to specify full path to your Documents folder.
  2. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from selfmade69 in Google Calculator Percentage xxx% of xxx   
    The Google Suggest workflow will do this as well.
  3. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from heyJoeCampbell in Recommendations for Sharing Workflows [Updated 3/26]   
    Recommendations for Sharing Workflows
     
    The forums have really been running well and you guys (and gals) have been creating some amazing workflows so far. I wanted to throw out a few suggestions though to make sure things stay organized, are easy to read, and easy to find.
     
    This will be an evolving document. Check back for questions regarding questions on posting your workflows. If you have a question that isn't answered within the contents of this thread, feel free to contact any of the moderators (Myself, Andrew, or Vero). 
     
    Post Titles
    Be specific. Don't be overly descriptive about every little feature the workflow provides. Titles are best kept to the workflow name, and potentially a few words on the overall gist of what it does.
     
    Tags
    Be sure to set topic tags for your workflow post. This will make it easier for users searching on the forums to find your post/workflow easily based off of a few key words.
     
    Dependencies
    Please include a listing of all dependencies for your workflow. This will hopefully alleviate potential problems that users run into from attempting to run an installed workflow without an installed package being present. Examples of this would be Ruby gems or Python modules or even Python versions that are required for using the workflow. If a specific application is required for your workflow to function, be sure to include a link to that applications website, or a link to it in the App Store as well. Also include, if necessary, required versions of OS X.
     
    System Modifications
    If your workflow creates or modifies any supporting files that would alter the users environment, this should be noted. This will make it known up front that your workflow modifies system file X to achieve its functionality. Also, if the user uninstalls the workflow, how to remove these files or restore the originals.
     
    Screenshots
    They aren't required, but providing a screenshot or two for your workflow helps provide users with a good idea of what it is they are about to download. Descriptions help, but many users are wanting to pop in, get a quick visual, and download.
     
    Posting
    When sharing a new workflow, please be sure to create your own thread for it. By posting it in another workflows thread, your workflow may never reach the masses. Create your own thread so that it stands out and everyone will be able to find it easily. This helps remove confusion on which workflow to download if there are multiple workflows, or modified workflows posted within the same thread. It also helps ensure that the develop that spent their time and put in the hard work to create the workflow get credit for their work. Posting a patch/update/fix/modified version of a workflow in another authors thread may steal attention from their original work. So let's try to be considerate.
     
    Sharing Multiple Workflows
    Try to limit a new thread to a single workflow. The reason for this follows the situation mentioned above. Unless you have an abnormally long title, users casually browsing the forums may not realize how many workflows are available in the post, or what they are. Creating a separate post for workflows also creates an individual area for you to provide support or answer questions for that workflow alone.
     
    Modifying Existing Workflows
    Most developers are very open to feature requests for their published workflows. So before modifying someone else's workflows, check with the developer and see if they would add the feature first. If the requested feature is something that the developer doesn't plan on adding, of course you could add the feature yourself. If you think it's a feature that others would also find greatly useful and you decide that you would like to share your modified version, please be respectful of the original developer give them a heads up before hand. Also, be courteous and give credit to the original author and/or a link back to their original thread so that they receive some credit for their work. Nobody enjoys having their work stolen.
     
    Updating You Workflows
    When sharing an update to an already posted workflow, rather than creating another post in the existing thread, update the initial post to include desired information and updated download links (if necessary). This makes it easier for users to find the most up to date version of your workflows, along with information what is included in the update. You could also modify the thread title to indicate the date that the workflow was last updated.
     
     
    Notice: I'm also going to try to monitor this thread and keep it clean. If you post suggestions for other things to be added to the document, if they are merged in, I will probably remove your original post. Questions will also be treated the same way. If answers are later added into the original post, I may remove the original question. This will hopefully keep it so that all documentation remains in the original post so someone doesn't potentially have to search through several pages of questions for find a simple answer.
  4. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from gandalfsaxe in Launch apps hidden?   
    I haven't tested this but, it appears that there is an option on the "open" terminal command that will launch apps either in the background OR hidden.
    ::open -- Usage: open [-e] [-t] [-f] [-W] [-R] [-n] [-g] [-h] [-b <bundle identifier>] [-a <application>] [filenames] [--args arguments] Help: Open opens files from a shell. By default, opens each file using the default application for that file. If the file is in the form of a URL, the file will be opened as a URL. Options: -a Opens with the specified application. -b Opens with the specified application bundle identifier. -e Opens with TextEdit. -t Opens with default text editor. -f Reads input from standard input and opens with TextEdit. -F --fresh Launches the app fresh, that is, without restoring windows. Saved persistent state is lost, excluding Untitled documents. -R, --reveal Selects in the Finder instead of opening. -W, --wait-apps Blocks until the used applications are closed (even if they were already running). --args All remaining arguments are passed in argv to the application's main() function instead of opened. -n, --new Open a new instance of the application even if one is already running. -j, --hide Launches the app hidden. -g, --background Does not bring the application to the foreground. -h, --header Searches header file locations for headers matching the given filenames, and opens them. These are the command line switches for the open command..
     
    Given this, it appears that you could create a workflow with a Run Script item and then tell it each application to launch using "open" and passing either the -j or -g option and launch the apps in their desired state.
     
    Exmaple:
    open -j /Applications/TextEdit.app
  5. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from howdytom in Quit all Applications and then shut down   
    You could use the Quit All Applications workflows system command and then just use the AppleScript out item to shut down. Something similar to this...
    tell application "System Events" tell process "Finder" click menu item "Shut Down" of menu "Apple" of menu bar 1 end tell end tell
  6. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from Empyreal in add ~/Library/Scripts to Alfred Search Scope?   
    This is done using a workflow and adding an Input->File Filter. File Filters allows you to create custom searches for Alfred where you are allowed to set a specific search scope, file type, show system files, etc.  File Filters are a Powerpack only feature. A little more documentation can be found here. If you need a little more info though, let me know and I'd be happy to give an example or help you set one up.
  7. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from artdev in Workflow Libraries and Helpers   
    Please see this newer thread for a more up-to-date list of libraries that support Alfred 3.
     
    Since the introduction of Alfred 2, there have been several extremely useful utility classes and other helpers crop up that simplify a lot of the tedious, common tasks associated with creating workflows. These utilities are developed and maintained by community members, not by the Alfred team. All support requests for these utilities should be directed to the original author.
     
    If you have another utility class that needs to be included in this list, send me a message or email (david@alfredapp.com) with information about it (name, description, short list of features, link to post or download page) and I will make sure that it gets added to the list.
     
    Special thanks to all the developers for their hard work and for sharing their work with us.
     
     
    Python
     
    Alfred-Workflow (by deanishe)
     
    A state-of-the-art Python library for Workflow developers. Support for Alfred 2 and 3.

    The library is simple to install, has no external dependencies, is very well-documented and maintained, and boasts an eye-wateringly high feature-to-size ratio at just 140 KB.

    Main features
    Catches, logs and notifies users (and developers) of errors in Workflows. No more confusing, silent failure. Super-simple, yet powerful data caching (e.g. from a web service) and storage. Easy-to-use storage of Workflow settings. Keychain access for secure storage (and cross-machine syncing) of sensitive data, like passwords and API keys. Tunable and understandable Alfred-like fuzzy search (e.g. got matches Game of Thrones as well as Baby Got Back. Or not: that's up to you.) Now with solid support for multi-word queries. Extremely lightweight, but full-featured, HTTP library with Requests-like interface, but just 12 KB instead of > 2 MB. Convenient access to standard OS X icons, for high-quality, familiar icons without adding size to the library. Also available via proper English. Pre-configured, built-in logging to enable simpler Workflow debugging. Painlessly run (update) scripts in the background without blocking your workflow, so you can still show "old" results while fetching new ones. Supports Alfred's new (version 2.3) modifier-specific subtitles. Simple support for 3rd-party libraries your Workflow relies on. "Magic" arguments to make developing/debugging Workflows so much easier, especially when helping less technically-inclined users. With "magic" arguments, you and your Workflow's users can open the Workflow's log file in Console.app, its cache and data directories in Finder, and its root directory in Finder orTerminal from the comfort of Alfred's query box. You can also delete the cache/data/settings if something is corrupted. Your workflow can update itself via GitHub releases. Accent-folding, so you can search non-ASCII text (e.g. voilà will be matched by voila) Functions to support migrating settings/data from older versions of your workflow. Well supported and kept up-to-date with Alfred's features as they are added. Alfred 3-only features
    Workflow variables Advanced modifiers Alfred 3-only updates  
    And as you can see from the above links, there is extensive documentation, including a two-part tutorial on building a Workflow from scratch.

    Examples

    Here are a few examples of how you can do some pretty cools stuff in just a few lines of code.
    A simple Workflow I made to search Packal in ~90 lines of code. A simple Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~50 lines of code. A polished, user-friendly, wicked-fast Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~200 lines of code. Remember, each of these Workflows also has—for free—full error-catching and -logging support, and the ability to open its log file (which contains all errors) via Alfred's query box. No need to ask users to grub around in ~/Library or flounder in Terminal here. This is not the Workflow library 2014 deserves, but it's the one it needs  
     
    Alp (developed by phyllisstein)
    alp is a Python module for developing Alfred workflows that bridges the gaps between Python and OS X and Python and Alfred, making the process of creating a workflow quick and easy. As it's essentially a collection of shortcuts for common and repetitive tasks, developers will find that working with alp results in less and more efficient code and a generally more sane workflow development experience. A painstaking guide to its various features, bells, and whistles is available in the README at the Github repository.
     
    Features:
    Simplified generation of feedback XML. Shortcuts for bundle ID, storage paths, settings, and arbitrary plist and JSON files. OS X interaction features, including the sending of additional notifications, interaction with the Keychain, and interaction with Spotlight. Internet interaction features, including bundled modules for making and caching HTTP requests, parsing markup data, and sending e-mail. The ability to remove unneeded modules for a svelte workflow bundle.  
    Alfred-Python (developed by JinnLynn)
    alfred-python is a full-featured python module that helps building Alfed workflow quick and easy.
      Features: Simple feedback XML generation Provides functions for storing or retrieving cache data Workflow configuration management Includes an easy way to download remote file Easily get bundle id, query arguments, etc. More code example can be found on my own workflows.  
     
     
    PHP
    Workflows (developed by David Ferguson)
    Workflows is a PHP library for building Alfred 2 workflows using PHP. Installation is quick and easy. Just drop in the Workflows.php class file, import it into your code, and initialize it. Full documentation, with usage examples can be found on David's blog.
     
    Features:
    Simple XML generation Read/writing files as plain text, json, etc. Read/write plist values Find local files Provide access to commonly used paths (home, cache, current, data storage, etc) Easy HTTP/cURL requests  
     
    Haskell
    AlfredLibraryInHaskell (developed by raguay.customct)
    This is a Haskell library for creating Alfred workflows.
     
     
     
    AppleScript
    qWorkflow (developed by ursanrazvan)
    qWorkflow is an AppleScript library for creating workflows with Alfred 2. This library provides an object-oriented approach for working with plist settings files, reading and writing data to files, generating Alfred feedback results, requesting remote data, parsing JSON data, and more.
     
    Features:
    object-oriented approach to write less & more readable code heavily documented with code samples internal workflow introspection (finding the bundle ID, cache & storage paths) generate Alfred-compatible XML feedback with ease saving & retrieving workflow-related settings (with support for default settings file) remote data requests, as well as JSON support sending notifications through the Notification Center various internal utilities that improve AppleScript (string and date manipulation, file system utilities) More info & example workflows created with this support library can be found on the project's github repo
     
     
     
    Go
     
    goAlfred (Developed by raguay.customct) 
    This go library is used to create workflows for Alfred 2 easier in the go language from Google (http://golang.org/). It will automatically create your cache and data directories. It also creates the xml listing for the feedback system. Examples included.
     
    Installation and Usage
    You install the library with:go get github.com/raguay/goAlfred # (You might have to use sudo). Any program that you want to use the library, just place this line in it: import "github.com/raguay/goAlfred"
     
    Functions
    The accessible function calls are:
     
    goAlfred.BundleId() - This will get your Bundle Id for your workflow.
    goAlfred.Cache() - This function returns the location of your cache directory.
    goAlfred.Home() - This function returns the location of your home directory.
    goAlfred.Data() - This function returns the location of your workflow's data directory.
    goAlfred.Path() - This function returns the location of your workflow's directory.
    goAlfred.Error() - Returns the last error received.
    AddResult( uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred.
    AddResultSimilar(instring string, uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred only if the title is similar to the instring given.
    goAlfred.SetDefaultString(title string) - This function sets a different default message if no results have been added.
    goAlfred.GetXML() - This function returns the XML string that needs to be given to Alfred. 
     
     
     
     
    Bash
    BashWorkflowHandler (developed by _mk_)
     
    Features:
    create feedback xml save/read preferences volatile and non-volatile get workflow's cache dir get workflow's data dir get workflow's bundle id Usage examples can be found in the README at the GitHub repo.
     
     
    Bash Workflow Framework (developed by djc)
    BASH workflow framework which makes it simple to create a workflow which allows you to display feedback within Alfred after selecting a result, getting around the issue that "Script Filters are the only way to pass feedback to Alfred." Built to create easy reference workflows, or any other kind of workflow which does not want to leave Alfred immediately on selection of a result.
    Features:
    - Two modes for two different kinds of data: static and dynamic.
    - Creation of a static workflow only requires modification of a CSV-like file.
    - Static mode handles searching on query for you.
    - Dynamic workflow can be created using a BASH library ARF+.
    - Both modes allow for result and field-specific icons, validities, arguments, and autocomplete attributes.

    Extensive documentation in the README, and examples are included with download. Two methods of installation can be found on the github page.
     
     
     
    Ruby
    Alfred2-Ruby-Template (developed by zhauwu)
    A template for Ruby-based Alfred 2 workflow development.
     
    Features:
    Use standard bundler to easily package, manage, and update ruby gems in the workflow. Friendly exception and debug output to the Mac OS X Console Automate rescue feedback items to Alfred when something goes wrong. Automate saving and loading cached feedback  
    Alfredo (developed by Dennis Paagman)
    Alfredo is simple ruby gem that makes it easy to create workflows and items to it. You can get started with only 4 lines of code.   Features:
    Generates valid Workflow XML Add items with one line of code Supports all Alfred 2 workflow features  
     
     
    Swift
     
    AlfredSwiftLibrary (developed by raguay.customct)
     
     
     
     
    General
    Alleyoop (developed by phyllisstein)
    Alleyoop is a meta-workflow that implements a system for updating other workflows. Users can make use of its features by downloading the workflow module and entering the query oop, which searches for compatible workflows and checks for available updates. Developers can implement Alleyoop compatibility with two simple, human-readable JSON files, described in the original post: one stored on a remote server, one placed in the workflow's folder.
     
    Alfred Dependency Downloader Framework (developer by Shawn Rice)
    Do you want to have versioned libraries and utilities live side-by-side? Do you want to make your workflows smaller but keep or expand the functionality with helper apps? Do you want to make sure that everything works regardless of whether Gatekeeper is active on other users' computers? Then you might consider implementing the Alfred Bundler* dependency framework in your workflows. If you want to see a _very_ basic implementation, then download an example workflow from Packal and open it up to see the workflow's anatomy. The libraries / utilities mentioned below are just pre-defined assets that you can load with no additional work. You can actually use this framework for any asset** by including a small JSON file with your workflow. Take a look at the documentation page on Github or the original post for more information.
  8. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from Wildcard in Search Inside Files in File Filter?   
    Is it indeed possible. Add your file filter and then go to the Advanced tab inside of it, and click the + to add a field. Add kMDItemTextContent.
     
    That should get you going! Let me know if there's anything else I can help with.
  9. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from Wildcard in Howto exclude folder(s) from Alfred File Search ?   
    I have Parallels installed right now and can actually test this so..
     
    I opened Spotlight prefs, went to the Privacy tab. I popped open Alfred in File Browse mode by pressing ~. Alfred showed the contents of my Home folder, including the Applications folder, and Applications (Parallels). I dragged and dropped the Applications (Parallels) folder into the Spotlight Privacy area, then popped Alfred back up and typed 'reload' to reload the app  cache and all Parallels applications disappeared from the results.
     
    Can you verify that these were the exact steps you took?
  10. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from nikivi in Workflow Libraries and Helpers   
    Please see this newer thread for a more up-to-date list of libraries that support Alfred 3.
     
    Since the introduction of Alfred 2, there have been several extremely useful utility classes and other helpers crop up that simplify a lot of the tedious, common tasks associated with creating workflows. These utilities are developed and maintained by community members, not by the Alfred team. All support requests for these utilities should be directed to the original author.
     
    If you have another utility class that needs to be included in this list, send me a message or email (david@alfredapp.com) with information about it (name, description, short list of features, link to post or download page) and I will make sure that it gets added to the list.
     
    Special thanks to all the developers for their hard work and for sharing their work with us.
     
     
    Python
     
    Alfred-Workflow (by deanishe)
     
    A state-of-the-art Python library for Workflow developers. Support for Alfred 2 and 3.

    The library is simple to install, has no external dependencies, is very well-documented and maintained, and boasts an eye-wateringly high feature-to-size ratio at just 140 KB.

    Main features
    Catches, logs and notifies users (and developers) of errors in Workflows. No more confusing, silent failure. Super-simple, yet powerful data caching (e.g. from a web service) and storage. Easy-to-use storage of Workflow settings. Keychain access for secure storage (and cross-machine syncing) of sensitive data, like passwords and API keys. Tunable and understandable Alfred-like fuzzy search (e.g. got matches Game of Thrones as well as Baby Got Back. Or not: that's up to you.) Now with solid support for multi-word queries. Extremely lightweight, but full-featured, HTTP library with Requests-like interface, but just 12 KB instead of > 2 MB. Convenient access to standard OS X icons, for high-quality, familiar icons without adding size to the library. Also available via proper English. Pre-configured, built-in logging to enable simpler Workflow debugging. Painlessly run (update) scripts in the background without blocking your workflow, so you can still show "old" results while fetching new ones. Supports Alfred's new (version 2.3) modifier-specific subtitles. Simple support for 3rd-party libraries your Workflow relies on. "Magic" arguments to make developing/debugging Workflows so much easier, especially when helping less technically-inclined users. With "magic" arguments, you and your Workflow's users can open the Workflow's log file in Console.app, its cache and data directories in Finder, and its root directory in Finder orTerminal from the comfort of Alfred's query box. You can also delete the cache/data/settings if something is corrupted. Your workflow can update itself via GitHub releases. Accent-folding, so you can search non-ASCII text (e.g. voilà will be matched by voila) Functions to support migrating settings/data from older versions of your workflow. Well supported and kept up-to-date with Alfred's features as they are added. Alfred 3-only features
    Workflow variables Advanced modifiers Alfred 3-only updates  
    And as you can see from the above links, there is extensive documentation, including a two-part tutorial on building a Workflow from scratch.

    Examples

    Here are a few examples of how you can do some pretty cools stuff in just a few lines of code.
    A simple Workflow I made to search Packal in ~90 lines of code. A simple Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~50 lines of code. A polished, user-friendly, wicked-fast Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~200 lines of code. Remember, each of these Workflows also has—for free—full error-catching and -logging support, and the ability to open its log file (which contains all errors) via Alfred's query box. No need to ask users to grub around in ~/Library or flounder in Terminal here. This is not the Workflow library 2014 deserves, but it's the one it needs  
     
    Alp (developed by phyllisstein)
    alp is a Python module for developing Alfred workflows that bridges the gaps between Python and OS X and Python and Alfred, making the process of creating a workflow quick and easy. As it's essentially a collection of shortcuts for common and repetitive tasks, developers will find that working with alp results in less and more efficient code and a generally more sane workflow development experience. A painstaking guide to its various features, bells, and whistles is available in the README at the Github repository.
     
    Features:
    Simplified generation of feedback XML. Shortcuts for bundle ID, storage paths, settings, and arbitrary plist and JSON files. OS X interaction features, including the sending of additional notifications, interaction with the Keychain, and interaction with Spotlight. Internet interaction features, including bundled modules for making and caching HTTP requests, parsing markup data, and sending e-mail. The ability to remove unneeded modules for a svelte workflow bundle.  
    Alfred-Python (developed by JinnLynn)
    alfred-python is a full-featured python module that helps building Alfed workflow quick and easy.
      Features: Simple feedback XML generation Provides functions for storing or retrieving cache data Workflow configuration management Includes an easy way to download remote file Easily get bundle id, query arguments, etc. More code example can be found on my own workflows.  
     
     
    PHP
    Workflows (developed by David Ferguson)
    Workflows is a PHP library for building Alfred 2 workflows using PHP. Installation is quick and easy. Just drop in the Workflows.php class file, import it into your code, and initialize it. Full documentation, with usage examples can be found on David's blog.
     
    Features:
    Simple XML generation Read/writing files as plain text, json, etc. Read/write plist values Find local files Provide access to commonly used paths (home, cache, current, data storage, etc) Easy HTTP/cURL requests  
     
    Haskell
    AlfredLibraryInHaskell (developed by raguay.customct)
    This is a Haskell library for creating Alfred workflows.
     
     
     
    AppleScript
    qWorkflow (developed by ursanrazvan)
    qWorkflow is an AppleScript library for creating workflows with Alfred 2. This library provides an object-oriented approach for working with plist settings files, reading and writing data to files, generating Alfred feedback results, requesting remote data, parsing JSON data, and more.
     
    Features:
    object-oriented approach to write less & more readable code heavily documented with code samples internal workflow introspection (finding the bundle ID, cache & storage paths) generate Alfred-compatible XML feedback with ease saving & retrieving workflow-related settings (with support for default settings file) remote data requests, as well as JSON support sending notifications through the Notification Center various internal utilities that improve AppleScript (string and date manipulation, file system utilities) More info & example workflows created with this support library can be found on the project's github repo
     
     
     
    Go
     
    goAlfred (Developed by raguay.customct) 
    This go library is used to create workflows for Alfred 2 easier in the go language from Google (http://golang.org/). It will automatically create your cache and data directories. It also creates the xml listing for the feedback system. Examples included.
     
    Installation and Usage
    You install the library with:go get github.com/raguay/goAlfred # (You might have to use sudo). Any program that you want to use the library, just place this line in it: import "github.com/raguay/goAlfred"
     
    Functions
    The accessible function calls are:
     
    goAlfred.BundleId() - This will get your Bundle Id for your workflow.
    goAlfred.Cache() - This function returns the location of your cache directory.
    goAlfred.Home() - This function returns the location of your home directory.
    goAlfred.Data() - This function returns the location of your workflow's data directory.
    goAlfred.Path() - This function returns the location of your workflow's directory.
    goAlfred.Error() - Returns the last error received.
    AddResult( uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred.
    AddResultSimilar(instring string, uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred only if the title is similar to the instring given.
    goAlfred.SetDefaultString(title string) - This function sets a different default message if no results have been added.
    goAlfred.GetXML() - This function returns the XML string that needs to be given to Alfred. 
     
     
     
     
    Bash
    BashWorkflowHandler (developed by _mk_)
     
    Features:
    create feedback xml save/read preferences volatile and non-volatile get workflow's cache dir get workflow's data dir get workflow's bundle id Usage examples can be found in the README at the GitHub repo.
     
     
    Bash Workflow Framework (developed by djc)
    BASH workflow framework which makes it simple to create a workflow which allows you to display feedback within Alfred after selecting a result, getting around the issue that "Script Filters are the only way to pass feedback to Alfred." Built to create easy reference workflows, or any other kind of workflow which does not want to leave Alfred immediately on selection of a result.
    Features:
    - Two modes for two different kinds of data: static and dynamic.
    - Creation of a static workflow only requires modification of a CSV-like file.
    - Static mode handles searching on query for you.
    - Dynamic workflow can be created using a BASH library ARF+.
    - Both modes allow for result and field-specific icons, validities, arguments, and autocomplete attributes.

    Extensive documentation in the README, and examples are included with download. Two methods of installation can be found on the github page.
     
     
     
    Ruby
    Alfred2-Ruby-Template (developed by zhauwu)
    A template for Ruby-based Alfred 2 workflow development.
     
    Features:
    Use standard bundler to easily package, manage, and update ruby gems in the workflow. Friendly exception and debug output to the Mac OS X Console Automate rescue feedback items to Alfred when something goes wrong. Automate saving and loading cached feedback  
    Alfredo (developed by Dennis Paagman)
    Alfredo is simple ruby gem that makes it easy to create workflows and items to it. You can get started with only 4 lines of code.   Features:
    Generates valid Workflow XML Add items with one line of code Supports all Alfred 2 workflow features  
     
     
    Swift
     
    AlfredSwiftLibrary (developed by raguay.customct)
     
     
     
     
    General
    Alleyoop (developed by phyllisstein)
    Alleyoop is a meta-workflow that implements a system for updating other workflows. Users can make use of its features by downloading the workflow module and entering the query oop, which searches for compatible workflows and checks for available updates. Developers can implement Alleyoop compatibility with two simple, human-readable JSON files, described in the original post: one stored on a remote server, one placed in the workflow's folder.
     
    Alfred Dependency Downloader Framework (developer by Shawn Rice)
    Do you want to have versioned libraries and utilities live side-by-side? Do you want to make your workflows smaller but keep or expand the functionality with helper apps? Do you want to make sure that everything works regardless of whether Gatekeeper is active on other users' computers? Then you might consider implementing the Alfred Bundler* dependency framework in your workflows. If you want to see a _very_ basic implementation, then download an example workflow from Packal and open it up to see the workflow's anatomy. The libraries / utilities mentioned below are just pre-defined assets that you can load with no additional work. You can actually use this framework for any asset** by including a small JSON file with your workflow. Take a look at the documentation page on Github or the original post for more information.
  11. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from robster in Outlook 15: email as attachment is put in Drafts [Accepted, workaround available]   
    Hey I've been trying to get some more testing done with this but I can go ahead and share the script I have for now which should get the latest Outlook for Mac working for you. Download the script linked here and drop it in this folder: ~/Library/Application Support/Alfred 2/Plugins/Email
     
    That should get the latest version working. I'm still trying to get it tested to see if that breaks Outlook support in older versions. Let me know if you have any issues with this please
  12. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from krokofant in Ignore Applications in Search?   
    The easiest thing to do is open Spotlight preferences, navigate to the Privacy tab and then drag the application/file/folders you wish to hide into there. Alfred uses Spotlights metadata server so if Spotlight ignores it, Alfred will also.
  13. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from claui in Certain Applications Aren't Found In Results   
    Try two things and let me know the outcome please.
     
    1. Pop up Alfred and type Reload and press enter to reload the Application Cache.
    2. If the above doesn't work, even though Spotlight finds them, try reindexing.
     
    Let me know if this clears up your issue.
  14. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from xilopaint in Workflow Libraries and Helpers   
    Please see this newer thread for a more up-to-date list of libraries that support Alfred 3.
     
    Since the introduction of Alfred 2, there have been several extremely useful utility classes and other helpers crop up that simplify a lot of the tedious, common tasks associated with creating workflows. These utilities are developed and maintained by community members, not by the Alfred team. All support requests for these utilities should be directed to the original author.
     
    If you have another utility class that needs to be included in this list, send me a message or email (david@alfredapp.com) with information about it (name, description, short list of features, link to post or download page) and I will make sure that it gets added to the list.
     
    Special thanks to all the developers for their hard work and for sharing their work with us.
     
     
    Python
     
    Alfred-Workflow (by deanishe)
     
    A state-of-the-art Python library for Workflow developers. Support for Alfred 2 and 3.

    The library is simple to install, has no external dependencies, is very well-documented and maintained, and boasts an eye-wateringly high feature-to-size ratio at just 140 KB.

    Main features
    Catches, logs and notifies users (and developers) of errors in Workflows. No more confusing, silent failure. Super-simple, yet powerful data caching (e.g. from a web service) and storage. Easy-to-use storage of Workflow settings. Keychain access for secure storage (and cross-machine syncing) of sensitive data, like passwords and API keys. Tunable and understandable Alfred-like fuzzy search (e.g. got matches Game of Thrones as well as Baby Got Back. Or not: that's up to you.) Now with solid support for multi-word queries. Extremely lightweight, but full-featured, HTTP library with Requests-like interface, but just 12 KB instead of > 2 MB. Convenient access to standard OS X icons, for high-quality, familiar icons without adding size to the library. Also available via proper English. Pre-configured, built-in logging to enable simpler Workflow debugging. Painlessly run (update) scripts in the background without blocking your workflow, so you can still show "old" results while fetching new ones. Supports Alfred's new (version 2.3) modifier-specific subtitles. Simple support for 3rd-party libraries your Workflow relies on. "Magic" arguments to make developing/debugging Workflows so much easier, especially when helping less technically-inclined users. With "magic" arguments, you and your Workflow's users can open the Workflow's log file in Console.app, its cache and data directories in Finder, and its root directory in Finder orTerminal from the comfort of Alfred's query box. You can also delete the cache/data/settings if something is corrupted. Your workflow can update itself via GitHub releases. Accent-folding, so you can search non-ASCII text (e.g. voilà will be matched by voila) Functions to support migrating settings/data from older versions of your workflow. Well supported and kept up-to-date with Alfred's features as they are added. Alfred 3-only features
    Workflow variables Advanced modifiers Alfred 3-only updates  
    And as you can see from the above links, there is extensive documentation, including a two-part tutorial on building a Workflow from scratch.

    Examples

    Here are a few examples of how you can do some pretty cools stuff in just a few lines of code.
    A simple Workflow I made to search Packal in ~90 lines of code. A simple Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~50 lines of code. A polished, user-friendly, wicked-fast Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~200 lines of code. Remember, each of these Workflows also has—for free—full error-catching and -logging support, and the ability to open its log file (which contains all errors) via Alfred's query box. No need to ask users to grub around in ~/Library or flounder in Terminal here. This is not the Workflow library 2014 deserves, but it's the one it needs  
     
    Alp (developed by phyllisstein)
    alp is a Python module for developing Alfred workflows that bridges the gaps between Python and OS X and Python and Alfred, making the process of creating a workflow quick and easy. As it's essentially a collection of shortcuts for common and repetitive tasks, developers will find that working with alp results in less and more efficient code and a generally more sane workflow development experience. A painstaking guide to its various features, bells, and whistles is available in the README at the Github repository.
     
    Features:
    Simplified generation of feedback XML. Shortcuts for bundle ID, storage paths, settings, and arbitrary plist and JSON files. OS X interaction features, including the sending of additional notifications, interaction with the Keychain, and interaction with Spotlight. Internet interaction features, including bundled modules for making and caching HTTP requests, parsing markup data, and sending e-mail. The ability to remove unneeded modules for a svelte workflow bundle.  
    Alfred-Python (developed by JinnLynn)
    alfred-python is a full-featured python module that helps building Alfed workflow quick and easy.
      Features: Simple feedback XML generation Provides functions for storing or retrieving cache data Workflow configuration management Includes an easy way to download remote file Easily get bundle id, query arguments, etc. More code example can be found on my own workflows.  
     
     
    PHP
    Workflows (developed by David Ferguson)
    Workflows is a PHP library for building Alfred 2 workflows using PHP. Installation is quick and easy. Just drop in the Workflows.php class file, import it into your code, and initialize it. Full documentation, with usage examples can be found on David's blog.
     
    Features:
    Simple XML generation Read/writing files as plain text, json, etc. Read/write plist values Find local files Provide access to commonly used paths (home, cache, current, data storage, etc) Easy HTTP/cURL requests  
     
    Haskell
    AlfredLibraryInHaskell (developed by raguay.customct)
    This is a Haskell library for creating Alfred workflows.
     
     
     
    AppleScript
    qWorkflow (developed by ursanrazvan)
    qWorkflow is an AppleScript library for creating workflows with Alfred 2. This library provides an object-oriented approach for working with plist settings files, reading and writing data to files, generating Alfred feedback results, requesting remote data, parsing JSON data, and more.
     
    Features:
    object-oriented approach to write less & more readable code heavily documented with code samples internal workflow introspection (finding the bundle ID, cache & storage paths) generate Alfred-compatible XML feedback with ease saving & retrieving workflow-related settings (with support for default settings file) remote data requests, as well as JSON support sending notifications through the Notification Center various internal utilities that improve AppleScript (string and date manipulation, file system utilities) More info & example workflows created with this support library can be found on the project's github repo
     
     
     
    Go
     
    goAlfred (Developed by raguay.customct) 
    This go library is used to create workflows for Alfred 2 easier in the go language from Google (http://golang.org/). It will automatically create your cache and data directories. It also creates the xml listing for the feedback system. Examples included.
     
    Installation and Usage
    You install the library with:go get github.com/raguay/goAlfred # (You might have to use sudo). Any program that you want to use the library, just place this line in it: import "github.com/raguay/goAlfred"
     
    Functions
    The accessible function calls are:
     
    goAlfred.BundleId() - This will get your Bundle Id for your workflow.
    goAlfred.Cache() - This function returns the location of your cache directory.
    goAlfred.Home() - This function returns the location of your home directory.
    goAlfred.Data() - This function returns the location of your workflow's data directory.
    goAlfred.Path() - This function returns the location of your workflow's directory.
    goAlfred.Error() - Returns the last error received.
    AddResult( uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred.
    AddResultSimilar(instring string, uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred only if the title is similar to the instring given.
    goAlfred.SetDefaultString(title string) - This function sets a different default message if no results have been added.
    goAlfred.GetXML() - This function returns the XML string that needs to be given to Alfred. 
     
     
     
     
    Bash
    BashWorkflowHandler (developed by _mk_)
     
    Features:
    create feedback xml save/read preferences volatile and non-volatile get workflow's cache dir get workflow's data dir get workflow's bundle id Usage examples can be found in the README at the GitHub repo.
     
     
    Bash Workflow Framework (developed by djc)
    BASH workflow framework which makes it simple to create a workflow which allows you to display feedback within Alfred after selecting a result, getting around the issue that "Script Filters are the only way to pass feedback to Alfred." Built to create easy reference workflows, or any other kind of workflow which does not want to leave Alfred immediately on selection of a result.
    Features:
    - Two modes for two different kinds of data: static and dynamic.
    - Creation of a static workflow only requires modification of a CSV-like file.
    - Static mode handles searching on query for you.
    - Dynamic workflow can be created using a BASH library ARF+.
    - Both modes allow for result and field-specific icons, validities, arguments, and autocomplete attributes.

    Extensive documentation in the README, and examples are included with download. Two methods of installation can be found on the github page.
     
     
     
    Ruby
    Alfred2-Ruby-Template (developed by zhauwu)
    A template for Ruby-based Alfred 2 workflow development.
     
    Features:
    Use standard bundler to easily package, manage, and update ruby gems in the workflow. Friendly exception and debug output to the Mac OS X Console Automate rescue feedback items to Alfred when something goes wrong. Automate saving and loading cached feedback  
    Alfredo (developed by Dennis Paagman)
    Alfredo is simple ruby gem that makes it easy to create workflows and items to it. You can get started with only 4 lines of code.   Features:
    Generates valid Workflow XML Add items with one line of code Supports all Alfred 2 workflow features  
     
     
    Swift
     
    AlfredSwiftLibrary (developed by raguay.customct)
     
     
     
     
    General
    Alleyoop (developed by phyllisstein)
    Alleyoop is a meta-workflow that implements a system for updating other workflows. Users can make use of its features by downloading the workflow module and entering the query oop, which searches for compatible workflows and checks for available updates. Developers can implement Alleyoop compatibility with two simple, human-readable JSON files, described in the original post: one stored on a remote server, one placed in the workflow's folder.
     
    Alfred Dependency Downloader Framework (developer by Shawn Rice)
    Do you want to have versioned libraries and utilities live side-by-side? Do you want to make your workflows smaller but keep or expand the functionality with helper apps? Do you want to make sure that everything works regardless of whether Gatekeeper is active on other users' computers? Then you might consider implementing the Alfred Bundler* dependency framework in your workflows. If you want to see a _very_ basic implementation, then download an example workflow from Packal and open it up to see the workflow's anatomy. The libraries / utilities mentioned below are just pre-defined assets that you can load with no additional work. You can actually use this framework for any asset** by including a small JSON file with your workflow. Take a look at the documentation page on Github or the original post for more information.
  15. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from Will-i-am in Coding clean up   
    Bill, I moved this into the workflow help section of the forums to get it a little more exposure.
     
    Are you needing help with something in particular on this or simply looking for pointers?
  16. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from zkarj in The impending El Capitan   
    I've had El Capitan on a machine since the first beta. Alfred has worked flawlessly on it all the way through. I will say however, GM isn't ALWAYS the last release. That being said, I believe the release date for El Capitan was determined to be next week (based on the little easter egg in the keynote).  I'd probably recommend waiting until then to do the install unless you're just really wanting it.
  17. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from miguelmcolon in Trying to make script for opening Google Chrome in incognito mode   
    To expand a bit on what nisbet suggested...
     
    1. Create a new Workflow in Alfred
    2. Click the + in the top right of the workflow area.
    3. For a keyword to trigger click, add Input -> Keyword, for a hotkey, choose Triggers -> Hotkey.
    4. Set options for the hotkey or keyword that you added and save.
    5. Click the + in the top right again.
    6. Choose Actions -> Run Script.
    7. Leave the language as /bin/bash, in the script area, enter your script from above and save.
    8. Mouse over the hotkey or keyword and a little tab should appear on the right side. Click and drag it to the action. A line should be shown between the two showing that they are connected.
     
    After that, you should be ready.
  18. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from helpmeplease in Am I crazy or is the clipboard not working?   
    Could you try deleting ~/Library/Application Support/Alfred 2/Databases/clipboard.alfdb and see if that helps? May need to restart Alfred afterward but I don't think you do.
  19. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from 10litrov in Workflow Libraries and Helpers   
    Please see this newer thread for a more up-to-date list of libraries that support Alfred 3.
     
    Since the introduction of Alfred 2, there have been several extremely useful utility classes and other helpers crop up that simplify a lot of the tedious, common tasks associated with creating workflows. These utilities are developed and maintained by community members, not by the Alfred team. All support requests for these utilities should be directed to the original author.
     
    If you have another utility class that needs to be included in this list, send me a message or email (david@alfredapp.com) with information about it (name, description, short list of features, link to post or download page) and I will make sure that it gets added to the list.
     
    Special thanks to all the developers for their hard work and for sharing their work with us.
     
     
    Python
     
    Alfred-Workflow (by deanishe)
     
    A state-of-the-art Python library for Workflow developers. Support for Alfred 2 and 3.

    The library is simple to install, has no external dependencies, is very well-documented and maintained, and boasts an eye-wateringly high feature-to-size ratio at just 140 KB.

    Main features
    Catches, logs and notifies users (and developers) of errors in Workflows. No more confusing, silent failure. Super-simple, yet powerful data caching (e.g. from a web service) and storage. Easy-to-use storage of Workflow settings. Keychain access for secure storage (and cross-machine syncing) of sensitive data, like passwords and API keys. Tunable and understandable Alfred-like fuzzy search (e.g. got matches Game of Thrones as well as Baby Got Back. Or not: that's up to you.) Now with solid support for multi-word queries. Extremely lightweight, but full-featured, HTTP library with Requests-like interface, but just 12 KB instead of > 2 MB. Convenient access to standard OS X icons, for high-quality, familiar icons without adding size to the library. Also available via proper English. Pre-configured, built-in logging to enable simpler Workflow debugging. Painlessly run (update) scripts in the background without blocking your workflow, so you can still show "old" results while fetching new ones. Supports Alfred's new (version 2.3) modifier-specific subtitles. Simple support for 3rd-party libraries your Workflow relies on. "Magic" arguments to make developing/debugging Workflows so much easier, especially when helping less technically-inclined users. With "magic" arguments, you and your Workflow's users can open the Workflow's log file in Console.app, its cache and data directories in Finder, and its root directory in Finder orTerminal from the comfort of Alfred's query box. You can also delete the cache/data/settings if something is corrupted. Your workflow can update itself via GitHub releases. Accent-folding, so you can search non-ASCII text (e.g. voilà will be matched by voila) Functions to support migrating settings/data from older versions of your workflow. Well supported and kept up-to-date with Alfred's features as they are added. Alfred 3-only features
    Workflow variables Advanced modifiers Alfred 3-only updates  
    And as you can see from the above links, there is extensive documentation, including a two-part tutorial on building a Workflow from scratch.

    Examples

    Here are a few examples of how you can do some pretty cools stuff in just a few lines of code.
    A simple Workflow I made to search Packal in ~90 lines of code. A simple Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~50 lines of code. A polished, user-friendly, wicked-fast Workflow to search your recent Pinboard posts in ~200 lines of code. Remember, each of these Workflows also has—for free—full error-catching and -logging support, and the ability to open its log file (which contains all errors) via Alfred's query box. No need to ask users to grub around in ~/Library or flounder in Terminal here. This is not the Workflow library 2014 deserves, but it's the one it needs  
     
    Alp (developed by phyllisstein)
    alp is a Python module for developing Alfred workflows that bridges the gaps between Python and OS X and Python and Alfred, making the process of creating a workflow quick and easy. As it's essentially a collection of shortcuts for common and repetitive tasks, developers will find that working with alp results in less and more efficient code and a generally more sane workflow development experience. A painstaking guide to its various features, bells, and whistles is available in the README at the Github repository.
     
    Features:
    Simplified generation of feedback XML. Shortcuts for bundle ID, storage paths, settings, and arbitrary plist and JSON files. OS X interaction features, including the sending of additional notifications, interaction with the Keychain, and interaction with Spotlight. Internet interaction features, including bundled modules for making and caching HTTP requests, parsing markup data, and sending e-mail. The ability to remove unneeded modules for a svelte workflow bundle.  
    Alfred-Python (developed by JinnLynn)
    alfred-python is a full-featured python module that helps building Alfed workflow quick and easy.
      Features: Simple feedback XML generation Provides functions for storing or retrieving cache data Workflow configuration management Includes an easy way to download remote file Easily get bundle id, query arguments, etc. More code example can be found on my own workflows.  
     
     
    PHP
    Workflows (developed by David Ferguson)
    Workflows is a PHP library for building Alfred 2 workflows using PHP. Installation is quick and easy. Just drop in the Workflows.php class file, import it into your code, and initialize it. Full documentation, with usage examples can be found on David's blog.
     
    Features:
    Simple XML generation Read/writing files as plain text, json, etc. Read/write plist values Find local files Provide access to commonly used paths (home, cache, current, data storage, etc) Easy HTTP/cURL requests  
     
    Haskell
    AlfredLibraryInHaskell (developed by raguay.customct)
    This is a Haskell library for creating Alfred workflows.
     
     
     
    AppleScript
    qWorkflow (developed by ursanrazvan)
    qWorkflow is an AppleScript library for creating workflows with Alfred 2. This library provides an object-oriented approach for working with plist settings files, reading and writing data to files, generating Alfred feedback results, requesting remote data, parsing JSON data, and more.
     
    Features:
    object-oriented approach to write less & more readable code heavily documented with code samples internal workflow introspection (finding the bundle ID, cache & storage paths) generate Alfred-compatible XML feedback with ease saving & retrieving workflow-related settings (with support for default settings file) remote data requests, as well as JSON support sending notifications through the Notification Center various internal utilities that improve AppleScript (string and date manipulation, file system utilities) More info & example workflows created with this support library can be found on the project's github repo
     
     
     
    Go
     
    goAlfred (Developed by raguay.customct) 
    This go library is used to create workflows for Alfred 2 easier in the go language from Google (http://golang.org/). It will automatically create your cache and data directories. It also creates the xml listing for the feedback system. Examples included.
     
    Installation and Usage
    You install the library with:go get github.com/raguay/goAlfred # (You might have to use sudo). Any program that you want to use the library, just place this line in it: import "github.com/raguay/goAlfred"
     
    Functions
    The accessible function calls are:
     
    goAlfred.BundleId() - This will get your Bundle Id for your workflow.
    goAlfred.Cache() - This function returns the location of your cache directory.
    goAlfred.Home() - This function returns the location of your home directory.
    goAlfred.Data() - This function returns the location of your workflow's data directory.
    goAlfred.Path() - This function returns the location of your workflow's directory.
    goAlfred.Error() - Returns the last error received.
    AddResult( uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred.
    AddResultSimilar(instring string, uid string, arg string, title string, sub string, icon string, valid string, auto string, rtype string) - This function allows you to build up the xml string for returning to Alfred only if the title is similar to the instring given.
    goAlfred.SetDefaultString(title string) - This function sets a different default message if no results have been added.
    goAlfred.GetXML() - This function returns the XML string that needs to be given to Alfred. 
     
     
     
     
    Bash
    BashWorkflowHandler (developed by _mk_)
     
    Features:
    create feedback xml save/read preferences volatile and non-volatile get workflow's cache dir get workflow's data dir get workflow's bundle id Usage examples can be found in the README at the GitHub repo.
     
     
    Bash Workflow Framework (developed by djc)
    BASH workflow framework which makes it simple to create a workflow which allows you to display feedback within Alfred after selecting a result, getting around the issue that "Script Filters are the only way to pass feedback to Alfred." Built to create easy reference workflows, or any other kind of workflow which does not want to leave Alfred immediately on selection of a result.
    Features:
    - Two modes for two different kinds of data: static and dynamic.
    - Creation of a static workflow only requires modification of a CSV-like file.
    - Static mode handles searching on query for you.
    - Dynamic workflow can be created using a BASH library ARF+.
    - Both modes allow for result and field-specific icons, validities, arguments, and autocomplete attributes.

    Extensive documentation in the README, and examples are included with download. Two methods of installation can be found on the github page.
     
     
     
    Ruby
    Alfred2-Ruby-Template (developed by zhauwu)
    A template for Ruby-based Alfred 2 workflow development.
     
    Features:
    Use standard bundler to easily package, manage, and update ruby gems in the workflow. Friendly exception and debug output to the Mac OS X Console Automate rescue feedback items to Alfred when something goes wrong. Automate saving and loading cached feedback  
    Alfredo (developed by Dennis Paagman)
    Alfredo is simple ruby gem that makes it easy to create workflows and items to it. You can get started with only 4 lines of code.   Features:
    Generates valid Workflow XML Add items with one line of code Supports all Alfred 2 workflow features  
     
     
    Swift
     
    AlfredSwiftLibrary (developed by raguay.customct)
     
     
     
     
    General
    Alleyoop (developed by phyllisstein)
    Alleyoop is a meta-workflow that implements a system for updating other workflows. Users can make use of its features by downloading the workflow module and entering the query oop, which searches for compatible workflows and checks for available updates. Developers can implement Alleyoop compatibility with two simple, human-readable JSON files, described in the original post: one stored on a remote server, one placed in the workflow's folder.
     
    Alfred Dependency Downloader Framework (developer by Shawn Rice)
    Do you want to have versioned libraries and utilities live side-by-side? Do you want to make your workflows smaller but keep or expand the functionality with helper apps? Do you want to make sure that everything works regardless of whether Gatekeeper is active on other users' computers? Then you might consider implementing the Alfred Bundler* dependency framework in your workflows. If you want to see a _very_ basic implementation, then download an example workflow from Packal and open it up to see the workflow's anatomy. The libraries / utilities mentioned below are just pre-defined assets that you can load with no additional work. You can actually use this framework for any asset** by including a small JSON file with your workflow. Take a look at the documentation page on Github or the original post for more information.
  20. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from hairihan.tong in Any way to open 1password login in Chrome Incognito tab/window?   
    I could be wrong on this but.. I don't think this is possible. Just like most other url related items in Alfred, Alfred does nothing special to them. Alfred just passes it off to OS X to handle the url with whatever the default is. Now.. I say it isn't possible but I mean it isn't possible in the fashion that I think you are REALLY wanting it in. You can't really apply an action to the urls from the 1Password integrated results so, there are two alternatives. You COULD make a workflow that would manually parse the 1Password file and let you search it and then do whatever you want with the url that way. Personally, I wouldn't recommend it, but that's your call. The second option would be to, use Alfred to search for the item using the standard '1p' keyword and find the login item. Instead of pressing enter, Cmd+C that bad boy and copy the 1Password specific version of the url. With that in your clipboard, you could have a workflow that opens a new incognito window and sets the location to that url or whatever you want to with it. There are numerous options from there.
  21. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from eriksatie in Block Websites   
    This would usually be done with a proxy. A hosts file COULD do it but.. editing it would require admin permissions unless you modified its permissions but, that's not something I'd recommend
  22. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from Latency in Send new email to myself   
    You could do this would a workflow that executes the following AppleScript
    tell application "Mail" activate set theMessage to make new outgoing message tell theMessage make new to recipient with properties {address:"<your email address>"} end tell end tell
  23. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from designsbytierney in Restore after OS X erase and resinstall   
    Are you currently using any software to sync settings to other machines such as Dropbox, Google Drive, etc? If so, then most settings could easily be restored after the reinstall by allowing all files to sync back to your machine, then setting up syncing in Alfred again.
     
    If you currently aren't using some 3rd party app to sync settings, then Alfred's preferences and settings live at ~/Library/Application Support/Alfred 2/
    Those settings could be copied or backed up and restored after the reinstall. 
  24. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from jshin593 in Creating Workflow to Open a New Window in Safari   
    To make a new window in Safari, you could do the following...
     
    Make a new workflow, add a hotkey, add a run script, set the language to osascript and enter the following code.
    tell application "Safari" activate make new document end tell
  25. Like
    jdfwarrior got a reaction from jhmast01 in Workflow query for websites ending in .asp   
    Are you familiar with creating Custom Searches in Alfred? Custom Searches will let you use custom urls for a site to search it from Alfred. Copy the url below and enter it into Alfred. This should import a custom search that will allow you to search the site you inquired about. The keyword for it is 'tax' and uses the same search parameters the site does. So, in Alfred you would type 'tax Public John Q'
     
    alfred://customsearch/Property%20Tax%20Search/tax/ascii/plus/http://www.jcsoky.org/ptax_search_results_name.asp?WEONM1={query}
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